Same-Sex Attractions

100 articles about experiencing unwanted same-sex attractions while embracing a traditional Christian sexual ethic

My Favorite Books

The following titles reinforce three valuable lessons in my mind . . .

  1. the need to be continuously introspective and self-aware of my life before God

  2. the need to extend sacrificial service, love and grace to others

  3. the immeasurable depth and purity of God’s love for every person, regardless of our (their) internal or external circumstances

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To read my summary of each book, click the book’s cover.

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To read my synopsis & review of this book, click the cover.

Included in this post are links to two brief audio interviews with author Mike Haley.

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To read my synopsis & review of this book, click the cover.

This post is composed of a short interview I had with author and speaker Chad Thompson. I wanted to ask him about his insight regarding young people and how Christians must learn to show love in more proactive, practical and demonstrable ways that can be acknowledged and received by others.

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To read my synopsis & review of this book, click the cover.

“Washed” and “waiting” (1 Corinthians 6:9 – 11; Romans 8:23 – 25) is Wesley Hill’s identity and struggle. In the author’s own words, “This book is written mainly for those gay Christians who are already convinced that their discipleship to Jesus necessarily commits them to the demanding, costly obedience of choosing not to nurture their homosexual desires, whether through private fantasies or physical relationships with other gay or lesbian people.”

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To read my synopsis & review of this book, click the cover.

In this book, Dr. Mark Yarhouse does address the usual topics most people are interested in (what causes homosexuality, can it be changed, how should I respond if someone I love announces a gay identity, etc.). But he also emphasizes two points I think too many people overlook: (1) narrow and divisive debates about the cause of sexual orientation (and whether it could be changed) should not be the Christian’s focus and (2) the sexual minority Christian should be embraced as a valuable member of his or her spiritual community (not marginalized).

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Joe DallasTo read my synopsis & review of this book, click the cover.

This blog entry is different. It is the only one where I give a short summary of each chapter in the book. The text covers an abbreviated history of the gay-rights and gay Christian movements, over 25 “pro-gay” arguments (related to the Bible, science and culture), over 35 counterarguments from the “traditionalist” view, and a helpful guide on how to effectively engage and address pro-gay theology within the church and in the public arena.

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To read my synopsis & review of this book, click the cover.

The tendency to aggressively use scientific research to advance ideological goals. The tendency to reshape Christian theology so it would fit one’s personal experiences or circumstances. The tendency of postmodern relativism to elevate self-actualization and subjective truth while diminishing (and dismissing) both science and Scripture altogether. Dr. Stanton Jones and Dr. Mark Yarhouse make compelling arguments that address these trends.

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To read my synopsis & review of this book, click the cover.

This book is one of the best resources that introduces and guides local churches into a more holistic approach and understanding of ministry in the area of homosexuality. Dr. Campbell (a Presbyterian pastor) has been researching, writing and ministering in this area for over twenty-five years. He also serves on the advisory board of OneByOne, a ministry “that exists to educate and equip churches to minister to those who desire freedom from unwanted same-sex attraction, sexual addiction, and the effects of sexual abuse.”

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To read my synopsis & review of this book, click the cover.

Melinda Selmys describes herself as a lesbian feminist atheist turned Catholic home school mother of four (seven children as of August 2013). Her volume of meditations is philosophical but quirky. The presentation of the Catholic perspective is practical. And her personal experiences and observations are realistic, honest and at times very frank. This post also includes an author interview and a link to Courage, an apostolate of the Catholic Church that ministers to persons with same-sex attractions.

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Yarhouse and Burkett To read my synopsis & review of this book, click the cover.

This is the third title by Dr. Mark Yarhouse to be featured on this blog. It (more than any other book on my list) has been most influential in helping me reconcile my sexual identity with my Christian faith.

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Yarhouse and Burkett To read my synopsis & review of this book, click the cover.

“I am a Christian. I love God. I want my life, my discipleship, my stewardship to glorify and please the Lord. I am beginning to understand (maybe even accept?) that my homosexual desires and inclinations will remain a part of my life. How do I live with same-sex attractions?”

This book lays out principles and options that can steer you in the right direction. In Part One I highlighted the authors’ goals in writing this book, their target audiences and a brief overview of the first three chapters. The focus of this post is (1) practical ways to manage our sexual identity and (2) what it means for our families and churches to “serve the image of God in all persons“.

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To read my synopsis & review of this book, click the cover.

“One cannot work within the GLBT community without facing the tough questions that are on the top of everyone’s mind – is homosexuality right or wrong; nature or nurture; sin or non-sin; “out and proud” or ex-gay? The purpose of elevating the conversation is not to answer those questions for you, but rather to give you the framework for gays and lesbians to answer those questions with you by their side. To elevate the conversation is to change the conversation – moving from the starting point of the conversation to the starting point of the conversation partner.” – Andrew Marin (author)

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To read my synopsis & review of this book, click the cover.

This book is the only one on my recommended list that isn’t wholly focused on the run-of-the-mill discourse surrounding homosexuality. The topics of gender and sexuality are touched upon briefly; but this is not a book about gender or sexuality. It is neither a “self-help” nor a “how-to” book. It is not a cultural analysis of what it means to be an unmarried person in a 21st century western society. It is an encouraging theological study geared toward single adults. However, I believe most Christians should seek to be blessed by its insights.

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To read my synopsis & review of this book, click the cover.

“Ministering To Gay Teenagers” is a simple and compassionate (but strong) introduction to a personal and sensitive topic. As he shares his experiences with same-sex attraction, author Shawn Harrison helps teens; parents and youth workers navigate difficult circumstances with Christ-centered love, grace and truth. Our call to action should include sharing information and resources like this book with everyone who works with our kids – parents, church leaders, youth workers and teachers. A revised version of this book was released in 2014.

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Sally GaryTo read Jonathan Storment’s review of Sally Gary’s book, click the cover.

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countryTo view the official website of Christopher Yuan, click the cover of his book.

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Mark YarhouseTo read Julie Rodgers’ review of Mark Yarhouse’s book, click the cover.

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I am interested in your suggestions as well. If you wish to give a brief synopsis and share how your favorite book(s) have helped you or someone you care about, I encourage you to do so in the “Comments” section below. However, if I discern a suggested title does not advance or support the theme and mission of this blog, it may be removed.

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